LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT TRAINING

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LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT TRAINING 2017-05-11T20:13:59+00:00

Leaders today must be able to work in ambiguity with unclear goals/objectives, continually acquire and hone their skills in interpersonal communication, conflict resolution, change management, motivation, and performance management–just to name a few–to maximize organizational performance and to minimize corporate liability. Unfortunately, most managers lack these contemporary skills necessary to manage today’s workforce–and discrimination and wrongful termination law suits are on the rise.

Do these challenges sound familiar?

“I just can’t seem to motivate my people! It seems like employees today just want to earn a paycheck for showing up–without having to do any work! I can’t believe how the work ethic has changed…”

“As a new supervisor I feel like I’m swimming in a sea of sharks—and every shark has a different personality!  I just don’t know how to handle these types of employees who just ‘push my buttons’ every time I have to give them a bit of constructive feedback!”

“Fred came in late yet again and said it was ‘FMLA time.’ This is the fifth time in two weeks! I’m getting tired of having to cover for him when he’s late.  I’d like to fire Fred, but I’m afraid if I do he’s going to sue us for age discrimination or say I’m firing him because he took FMLA…”

“I’m not sure if I’m cut out for being a manager. It feels like I’m more of a babysitter these days… I’m tired of handling the employee ‘drama’ and playing ‘judge and jury’ to resolve workplace conflicts. I wish I could figure out how to stop this babysitting and get my people to work together and get more done…”

These issues are happening because your leadership team is in need of professional development training.  A gap exists between their skill level in leading others and the reality of what they’re expected to handle on a day-to-day basis.   It isn’t uncommon for employees to move into leadership roles–without ever having had any formal leadership training.  Yet, the core competencies that are needed to work in a leadership role are completely different than an individual contributor role.  To illustrate this point, imagine if a bank teller is suddenly promoted to Branch Manager?  The competencies he/she will need in running a profitable bank branch, with a staff of employees, will be entirely different from working as a teller. He/she may have been very good at counting money and serving customers (individual contributor role) but how good will she be at setting performance goals and standards?  How about handling a religious accommodation issue with an employee who refuses to work on Sundays?  What about when the manager has to deal with two employees who refuse to work together because they can’t get along?  The reality is this leader is among many who are simply “thrown to the wolves” upon promotion.  Not a good strategy… And, the negative impacts from poor leadership are far reaching.  Lower customer satisfaction, lower productivity, lower profitability, higher turnover, higher absenteeism, and in many instances legal liability.

Leaders today must become contemporary leaders–who know how to navigate and drive organizational change and do it through building relationships. Supervisors and managers must possess good interpersonal skills or “people skills.” Without good people skills, it is incredibly difficult for them to communicate effectively at all levels, resolve conflict, manage performance, hold employees accountable, collaborate with others, motivate and inspire employees to perform, and manage change.  Also, leaders must have a solid understanding of how to manage within the boundaries of labor and employment laws to avoid discrimination, sexual harassment, and wrongful termination suits. Many people ask, “What’s the difference between management skills and leadership skills?”

  • Management skills are scheduling work shifts, handling payroll, or completing
    operational tasks using technical skills learned on the job.
  • Leadership skills involve communicating effectively to set performance goals and
    standards, coaching and delegating to develop others, providing feedback, and managing performance.

Things get managedpeople are led.

So, what makes RPC leadership training different from other training programs out there?

1. Our Competence and Experience.

For starters, we’re able to quickly assess the root causes of performance problems and develop solutions. Some training companies take forever and can get into “analysis paralysis.” To us, if a problem is as obvious as a ham sandwich–why analyze it to death??  We bring the expertise of leadership “from the trenches” and you’ll get no PhD’-ish psychobabble from us. No offense to academia, but our people speak in real world language–not management theory. Each one of our training consultants brings their real world experience to the classroom and relates their experiences to course content. Our RPC programs are concise, practical, experiential and drive changes in leadership behavior–guaranteed.

2. We’re easy to get along with to schedule and deliver training.

We deliver our training courses in a modular format–which means shorter courses. Also, we have a variety of training methods such as traditional classroom workshops, virtual classroom or Webinars, and even online training. We know some people find it challenging to get out of the office or operation to attend multiple-day programs. Therefore, we design our programs to ease scheduling and to increase retention of the material.

3. We’re cost effective.

By doing a great job of quickly identifying root causes to performance issues, we’re able to target training toward specific skill gaps–not put in an entire training program that includes things you don’t need.  With our competition, they aren’t nearly as nimble as we are and frequently charge a great deal for customization of training programs. We don’t. We’ve designed our programs in a modular format,, enabling us to customize the right curriculum for you that will drive the desired improvements in leadership behavior and business performance–at an affordable price.  A great way to look at an investment in leadership skills development is in the similar fashion to how we invest in upgrading technology.  Over time, software no longer works as effectively because the operating environment around it has gotten more complex, so we must upgrade it to improve operational efficiency.

Leadership development training is, to a certain degree, like upgrading the software in your human capital. By equipping leaders with the soft skills they need in communication, delegation, setting performance standards, aligning organizational goals, etc. you are upgrading their ability to better manage the operating environment around them. The bottom line—the workplace is different today. The employees are more culturally and generationally diverse, the employment laws are increasing in complexity, and technology and competition are continuing to drive organizational change. Now, more than ever before, you need to invest in leadership development training for your organization–or for your own professional development. To view the leadership training courses we provide, simply scroll down this page. After reviewing our courses, give us a call today at (800) 517-7129 and we’ll be happy to talk with you about your organization’s needs and how we can fit within your budget.

Leadership Essentials – The Supervision Series for Supervisors

Essential Skills of Leadership – Essential Skills of Communicating – Coaching Job Skills Communicating Up – Delegating – Developing Performance Goals Standards – Effective Discipline – Improving Work Habits – Managing Complaints – Providing Performance Resolving Conflicts – Supporting Change.
For individual course descriptions in The Supervision Series, please see our Training Programs page.

New Supervisor Programs

New supervisors face a very difficult challenge: How do I get everyone to respect me and see me as a leader? This is especially difficult for supervisors who are promoted from within and must now lead a group of former peers. Frequently, new leaders are faced with jealousy, resentment, and negativity from former peers and must contend with a variety of behavioral issues before being able to fully function in a leadership capacity.  Some authors refer to this period as “the testing period.” This is very true; yet what is not usually discussed in the leadership books is exactly HOW a new leader is supposed to handle this “testing” phase. The job of supervising people today is difficult and many new leaders question their career moves within their first year. Many wonder, “Why did I EVER decide to go into management???” The reason for their doubt is that they aren’t equipped with the skills in how to handle the “multiple personalities” of employees, the employee personal problems they seem to drag into work, and also handling the hectic pace of staying on top of emails, corporate communication about changes, etc. Many leaders refer to leadership as “babysitting.” The leaders I hear say this have not realized their full potential as leaders and their own negative views of their employees is what may be the actual root of the problem…although those leaders typically can’t see the “forest for the trees.” Being a leader is most definitely not being a babysitter—but rather being a very good parent. A leader needs to know how to set a good example, provide good, clear direction, handle conflict effectively, and in general demonstrate good leadership behaviors that create an environment where employees will want to follow the leader’s direction.

Making The Transition to Supervision (Half-Day Workshop)

Key Learning Objectives:

  • To teach new leaders how to make a smooth transition from a non-exempt to exempt role
  • To provide new leaders with knowledge regarding how to handle difficult situations during the first few years of supervision
  • To educate new leaders about the how-to’s of building a high-performing team
  • “Task Master” to “People Leader”, Assessing the shift in roles

New Supervisor Challenges:

  • Supervising friends
  • Supervising older/more experienced employees
  • Supervising younger/less experienced employees
  • Supervising the “I should’ve had your job” employees
  • The Impact of Supervision
  • Team activity: Exploring Micromanaging vs. “Hands-Off” Leadership
  • Developing Great Leadership Behaviors: The Do’s & Don’ts
  • Minimizing internal investigations by demonstrating effective leadership behaviors
  • Building a solid corporate culture by minimizing organizational dysfunction
  • Defining a team

Conducting Productive Team Meetings (Two-Hour Course)

Key Learning Objectives:

  • What is a team?
  • 2 C’s to Building a High-Performing Team
  • Identifying the 4 Stages of Team Development: Forming, Storming, Norming, and Performing
  • To acquire skills in how to improve meeting productivity and minimize conflict during meetings
  • To improve decision-making processes that drive business results
  • Why we need team meetings
  • The 4 F’s of Meeting Facilitation: Focus, Facilitation, Fellowship, Feedback
  • Decision-making processes
  • Skills of an Effective Facilitator: Dealing with team wreckers
  • Activity: Effective vs. Ineffective Team Behaviors: Defining “Rules of Engagement” for senior leadership team meetings

Conflict Dynamics Workshops (Half-Day Workshop)

Leaders today frequently refer to their role in organizations as being “baby sitters” vs. being leaders. The workplace today is challenging with frequent technological upgrades to processes, constant organizational changes, cultural diversity, and increased global competition. Combine those components with a workforce that needs more work/life balance due to domestic and financial pressures and many supervisors question why they made the leap into leadership in the first place. The workplace today is filled with a lot of negativity, employees who suffer from low self-esteem, and employers who have promoted leaders based on technical ability vs. their exceptional people skills and ability to resolve conflicts. Most supervisors practice “avoidance” strategies in the hope that employee squabbles and conflicts will simply go away—however they never do—and they only get worse as time goes on.

This intensive, half-day workshop provides leaders with the ability to identify their own strengths and weaknesses in handling conflict. They’ll learn how to identify active and passive responses to conflict as well as responses that are constructive—and destructive. They’ll acquire valuable skills to modify behavior from destructive responses to constructive–that will ultimately improve employee relations, minimize internal complaints, and increase employee satisfaction. This is an essential workshop for all front-line supervisors, particularly those who manage more non-exempt employees, as this population is typically an organization’s source for the most internal complaints to HR. For more senior leaders who manage a combination of exempts and non-exempts, or a staff comprised of all exempts, this workshop is extremely beneficial at improving team productivity, improving employee satisfaction, minimizing turnover, and internal complaints. Prior to attending the Conflict Dynamics Workshop, leaders will complete an online assessment of the Conflict Dynamics Profile (CDP). This assessment enables leaders to answer questions regarding their behavior during conflicts to identify their current pattern of behavior. The CDP is available in two report formats: an individual report format in which the leader will assess his/her own skills and a 360 degree format in which direct reports, colleagues, and the leader’s immediate supervisor evaluates his/her skill level at conflict resolution. The 360-degree CDP compares how leaders see themselves when handling conflict vs. how others see them. This process is very much an “eye opener” for a lot of leaders who perceive themselves as possessing good conflict resolution skills. Through comparing how others view them against their own results, leaders gain valuable insight into how to adjust their behavior to more constructive responses in order to improve relationship building and collaboration skills.

Key Learning Objectives:

  • To improve leaders’ skills in managing conflict by identifying their current destructive behaviors
  • To educate leaders regarding the various responses to conflict and the negative impacts on employees, workplaces, and organizational goals
  • To educate leaders on how to modify their conflict resolution behaviors from destructive to constructive on a daily basis
  • To improve overall interpersonal relationship-building skills both on the job and off

Effective Progressive Discipline Strategies (Half-Day Workshop)

Key Learning Objectives:

  • To educate leaders regarding the necessary “do’s and don’ts” of performance documentation
  • To improve leader effectiveness in delivering performance management documentation
  • To provide leaders with knowledge regarding how to avoid wrongful termination suits
  • Prevention not Punishment: Using Performance Improvement Plans
  • The Four-step Disciplinary Process:
    • Verbal, 1st Written Warning, Final Written Warning, Termination
    • Delivering an effective disciplinary notice using the “lifeguard” approach
    • Handling Terminations within the Boundaries of the Law
    • Preparing the separation agreement and termination documents that help to keep you out of court
    • Preparing a safe environment for the termination meeting to minimize potential for workplace violence
    • Delivering the termination message and proper exit strategies

Performance Management Courses

Conflict Dynamics Workshop (Half-Day Workshop)

Leaders today frequently refer to their role in organizations as being “baby sitters” vs. being leaders. The workplace today is challenging with frequent technological upgrades to processes, constant organizational changes, cultural diversity, and increased global competition. Combine those components with a workforce that needs more work/life balance due to domestic and financial pressures and many supervisors question why they made the leap into leadership in the first place. The workplace today is filled with a lot of negativity, employees who suffer from low self-esteem, and employers who have promoted leaders based on technical ability vs. their exceptional people skills and ability to resolve conflicts. Most supervisors practice “avoidance” strategies in the hope that employee squabbles and conflicts will simply go away—however they never do—and they only get worse as time goes on. This four-hour workshop provides leaders with the ability to identify their own strengths and weaknesses in handling conflict. They’ll learn how to identify active and passive responses to conflict as well as responses that are constructive—and destructive. They’ll acquire valuable skills to modify behavior from destructive responses to constructive–that will ultimately improve employee relations, minimize internal complaints, and increase employee satisfaction.

This is an essential workshop for all front-line supervisors, particularly those who manage more non-exempt employees, as this population is typically an organization’s source for the most internal complaints to HR. For more senior leaders who manage a combination of exempts and non-exempts, or a staff comprised of all exempts, this workshop is extremely beneficial at improving team productivity, improving employee satisfaction, minimizing turnover, and internal complaints. Prior to attending the Conflict Dynamics Workshop, leaders will complete an online assessment of the Conflict Dynamics Profile (CDP). This assessment enables leaders to answer questions regarding their behavior during conflicts to identify their current pattern of behavior. The CDP is available in two report formats: an individual report format in which the leader will assess his/her own skills and a 360 degree format in which direct reports, colleagues, and the leader’s immediate supervisor evaluates his/her skill level at conflict resolution. The 360-degree CDP compares how leaders see themselves when handling conflict vs. how others see them. This process is very much an “eye opener” for a lot of leaders who perceive themselves as possessing good conflict resolution skills. Through comparing how others view them against their own results, leaders gain valuable insight into how to adjust their behavior to more constructive responses in order to improve relationship building and collaboration skills.

Key Learning Objectives:

  • To improve leaders’ skills in managing conflict by identifying their current destructive behaviors
  • To educate leaders regarding the various responses to conflict and the negative impacts on employees, workplaces, and organizational goals
  • To educate leaders on how to modify their conflict resolution behaviors from destructive to constructive on a daily basis
  • To improve overall interpersonal relationship-building skills both on the job and off

Understanding and Handling Performance Problems 

Supervisors today have to endure a lot of “headaches” in the workplace. Employees are struggling with work/life balance issues, lack of education, personal problems such as lack of money or adequate day care, family matters, etc. Even though supervisors can say, “You need to learn how to work with Fred…” or “just leave your personal problems at home…” for many employees they just aren’t equipped with the skills to know how to handle the situations effectively. Also, some employees may not have as many personal issues but have true performance/skill issues on the job. Regardless of the root cause of a performance issue personal or work-related, if these issues are not handled effectively by leadership the problems just won’t go away on their own. Often, employees develop negative attitudes when they’re not performing well, are hounded by supervisors to “pick up the pace” or “get with the program” which then manifests into negative behaviors and even poorer performance on the job. Supervisors frequently contribute to performance problems because of their own negative behaviors in handling performance issues. Knee-jerk reactions to employee mistakes, damaging employees’ self-esteem through harsh words, or simply avoiding performance issues altogether only exacerbate the problem.

Today, because of the amount of administrative work typically required of supervisors, many feel they “just don’t have the time” to document or deal with poor performers. This leadership posture is dangerous because it creates an environment in which supervisors have shifted focus on administrative tasks vs. people leadership tasks. Also, with the onset of HR departments, some supervisors have even taken the position that dealing with “difficult employees” is the employee relations manager’s job! The bottom line—supervisors are leaders of people and achieve results through people.

Key Objectives:

  • To improve leaders’ skills in identifying root causes of employee performance problems
  • To educate leaders regarding the basic components of leadership needed for sustained peak performance of employees
  • To learn how to identify negative attitude vs. negative behavior employees to ensure appropriate corrective action
  • The Impact of Supervision
  • Team activity: Exploring Micromanaging vs. “Hands-Off” Leadership
  • Developing Great Leadership Behaviors: The Do’s & Don’ts
  • Minimizing internal investigations by demonstrating effective leadership behaviors
  • Building a solid corporate culture by minimizing organizational dysfunction
    • Good Supervision Practices: Confronting Performance Problems Early
    • Acknowledging the “I Don’t Know’s”, “I Can’t Do’s”, “I Won’t Do’s”
    • Creating a 1:1 process
    • Handling Negative Attitude Problems
    • Discovering the roots of attitudes
    • How supervisors create attitude problems
    • Case study: Digging to the “roots” of attitudes

Understanding Team Member Behavioral Styles (Half-Day Workshop)

Key Learning Objectives:

  • To educate leaders about their own behavioral style and how it affects their employees
  • To provide knowledge regarding how to “flex” one’s style to more effectively communicate with others
  • To provide educate leaders about diversity and how a combination of different styles leads to performance improvement and leaps in productivity
  • D.i.S.C. Profile Introduction
  • Activity: Completion of D.i.S.C. profile
  • Discussion of Strength Theme, Behavioral Pattern, Strengths, Weaknesses
  • Leveraging the knowledge of the D.i.S.C. to improve team dynamics

Defining and Aligning Organizational (Half-Day Workshop)

  • To learn how to create a strategic direction for the organization
  • To identify methods to cascade the objectives throughout the organization
  • To effectively engage employees in the organization’s purpose and mission
  • To educate leaders regarding effective vs. non-effective R&R systems
  • Working with SMART Goals
    • Defining the “Big Picture”: defining SMART strategic, organizational objectives
    • Aligning objectives: Mission/Goals/Tasks & Duties
    • Creating and Implementing Action Plans
    • Activity: Attacking a problem using the Action Planning Template
  • Reward & Recognition
    • Activity: Recognition brainstorming
    • Learning what works and what doesn’t work to motivate employee
  • The Impact of Supervision
    • Team activity: Exploring Micromanaging vs. “Hands-Off” Leadership
    • Developing Great Leadership Behaviors: The Do’s & Don’ts
    • Minimizing internal investigations by demonstrating effective leadership behaviors
    • Building a solid corporate culture by minimizing organizational dysfunction

Conducting Productive Team Meetings (Two-Hour Workshop)

Key Learning Objectives:

  • To acquire skills in how to improve meeting productivity and minimize conflict during meetings
  • To improve decision-making processes that drive business results
    • Why we need team meetings
    • The 4 F’s of Meeting Facilitation: Focus, Facilitation, Fellowship, Feedback
    • Decision-making processes
    • Skills of an Effective Facilitator: Dealing with team wreckers
    • Activity: Effective vs. Ineffective Team Behaviors: Defining “Rules of Engagement” for senior leadership team meetings

Effective Communication and Feedback Module (Half-Day Workshop)

Key Learning Objectives:

  • To improve leader effectiveness when providing employees direction and constructive criticism
  • How to create an environment of trust during review time to create partnership for improvement
  • Avoiding Communication problems
    • Jumping to Conclusions
    • Case Study: How to avoid negatively impacting employees and creating dysfunction
    • Learning effective listening skills to improve employee relations and performance
    • Learning effective change management strategies to avoid “Mutiny” and complaint
  • Activity: What/What/Why Feedback for Success Model
  • Delivering Effective Performance Reviews
    • Understanding how to deliver feedback for improvement—without damaging self-esteem
    • Learn how to leverage the review meeting to build trust, create goals, and improve employee performance
    • Documenting the review discussion, setting goals, and holding employees accountable for improvement

Effective Progressive Discipline Strategies (Three-Hour Workshop)

Key Learning Objectives:

  • To educate leaders regarding the necessary “do’s and don’ts” of performance documentation
  • To improve leader effectiveness in delivering performance management documentation
  • To provide leaders with knowledge regarding how to avoid wrongful termination suits
  • Prevention not Punishment: Using Performance Improvement Plans
  • The Four-step Disciplinary Process:
    • Verbal, 1st Written Warning, Final Written Warning, Termination
    • Delivering an effective disciplinary notice using the “lifeguard” approach
  • Handling Terminations within the Boundaries of the Law
    • Preparing the separation agreement and termination documents that help to keep you out of court
    • Preparing a safe environment for the termination meeting to minimize potential for workplace violence
    • Delivering the termination message and proper exit strategies

Labor and Employment Law Courses

Wage & Hour Law Courses (Four-Hour Workshop)

Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA)

The FLSA is one of the most critical laws that employers must understand and take measures to continually remain in compliance. This Act essentially defines how employers must classify workers for payment of overtime wages, how and when employees are to be paid, and provides regulations for child labor. The vast majority of employers are required to comply with the FLSA, although there are some compliance variations between public sector and private sector employers. Failure to comply with the FLSA can result in significant fines, payment of back wages to employees, and in some cases in which employers have willfully violated the FLSA, the Department of Labor will take the employer to court—a very costly endeavor. The majority of complaints to the Department of Labor begin, rather simply, with just one employee filing a complaint regarding his/her pay. In addition, since August 2004 when the FLSA was amended, many employers are significantly out of compliance regarding classification of workers—a key component of the new legislation. This four-hour workshop is absolutely essential for all human resource professionals, payroll administrators, small business owners, and all supervisors and managers.

Key Learning Objectives:

  • Learn the basics of how employees are classified: Exempt vs. Non-exempt to avoid a DOL inquiry
  • Understand how overtime is paid—and simple mistakes supervisors make that lead to costly litigation
  • Learn how to fix worker classification and payroll mistakes—before the DOL fixes them for you
  • Implement sound company policies regarding time keeping, payroll processing, and record keeping to minimize internal mistakes that lead to DOL inquiries

Family & Medical Leave Act Course (Half-Day Workshop)

Employers with greater than 50 employees on the payroll have a legal obligation to provide 12 weeks of unpaid leave to an employee with a serious health condition, an employee who has a parent, spouse or child with a serious health condition, or if the employee must take time off for birth, adoption, or foster care of a child. Many employers fail to understand their compliance obligations (including record keeping) and find out only when employees file a complaint with the Department of Labor. This module educates supervisors on the basics of the law, which employees are eligible for leave and when, how to handle a leave request, and how to handle issues such as an employee failing to return from leave.

Key Learning Objectives:

  • Learn the basic supervisor responsibilities to avoid legal land mines
  • Understand eligibility requirements to avoid a Department of Labor inquiry
  • Acquire effective record-keeping strategies to avoid an administrative nightmare—and litigation
  • Learn how to handle the challenging overlap of the FMLA, the ADA, and OSHA when a worker is injured on the job

Anti-Discrimination & Harassment Module (One-Day Workshop)

Employers with greater than 15 employees on the payroll have a legal obligation to comply with anti-discrimination and harassment laws. Since 1991 when Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 was amended, employers have realized a significant increase in monetary settlements for non-compliance. In 1991, the Act was amended to include punitive damages and trial by jury. This four-hour workshop provides leaders with a firm foundation of knowledge regarding all discrimination and harassment laws. It also provides employers with an affirmative defense, should a case go to court, that they have acted in “good faith” by providing training to its leadership team.

  • Title VII of The Civil Rights Act of 1964
    • Understanding harassment and hostile work environment to minimize your risk
    • Learning the basics of leading employees without violating discrimination laws
    • Strategies for effectively leading a culturally diverse workforce to minimize internal complaints
    • Identifying and handling sexual harassment in the workplace to avoid an EEOC charge and litigation
  • Americans with Disabilities Act ( ADA)
    • The basics of the ADA and employer compliance obligations
    • Learning the components of an effective job description to provide an affirmative defense in court
    • Determining how to reasonably accommodate without discriminating or setting a precedent
    • Learning how to handle a poor performer who claims to have a disability
    • Age Discrimination in Employment Act
  • Pregnancy Discrimination Act
    • Learning the most common employer activities that violate the law
    • Safe practices for recruitment, selection, and performance management to ensure legal compliance